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particledots
Forum Full Member


Registered: 05/25/09
Posts: 1560
Location: , United States
 
Re:Brace for Impact
Tuesday, July 11 2017 @ 11:46 PM CDT

Quote by: Daugrin


Day one. Nothing unusual happened. Maybe you could relax a little? In deference to your stern, heart felt warning, please keep all informed if ya feel something hit.

Daug



https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/jul/11/donald-trump-jr-email-chain-russia-hillary-clinton
MikeRobinson
Forum Full Member


Registered: 08/29/11
Posts: 733
Location: Chattanooga, TN United States
 
Re:Brace for Impact
Saturday, July 15 2017 @ 05:02 PM CDT

As I have said ... the root problem was that the election results in those precincts could not be ... and, never will be ... auditable.   You don’t need Russians to tamper with a system like that:   anyone could do it, and maybe do it undetected.   Human nature and human history tells us that if it is possible to stuff a ballot box, it will be stuffed.   If you have only an electronic report to go on, and there is no independent source of information to verify it, then, in this case, I would frankly presume that it is stuffing.   Therefore, it should be illegal to deploy an election system like these, for any election anywhere in the country.

At this point, I am more-than tired enough of hearing about Russians, or Trump Jr., or anything else of the sort.   Hillary Clinton lost the election simply because she never could have won it.   Now, we have a country to run ... and, to repair.   The people whom we have put into the Executive Branch are unlike anyone and everyone we have ever had before, but this also was by choice.   It is time to translate that choice into progress.
MikeRobinson
Forum Full Member


Registered: 08/29/11
Posts: 733
Location: Chattanooga, TN United States
 
Re:Brace for Impact
Tuesday, July 18 2017 @ 08:32 PM CDT

In a private message, ChiKoppi shared this link with me:

Colorado to require advanced post-election audits.
The procedure — known as a “risk-limiting” audit — allows officials to double-check a sample of paper ballots against digital tallies to determine whether results were tabulated correctly.   The election security firm Free & Fair will design the auditing software for Colorado, and the state will make the technology available for other states to modify for their own use.

The audit will allow Colorado to say, “with a high level of statistical probability that has never existed before,” that official election results have not been manipulated, said Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams in a statement.

Which ... as computer professionals have been saying for many years to until-now deaf ears ... has been fundamentally necessary for a very, very long time.

I think that, when you cast your ballot, you should first be asked politely to pass it through a scanner where a little spinning wheel will break off “hanging chads” (if applicable), and scan your ballot for obvious errors such as forgetting to vote on some item or voting for more than one person.   The ballot is then handed back to you and you are invited to review it one more time to be sure that the ballot does indeed represent your sovereign intent as a Voter.   And then, you insert it into the ballot box, where it is read by another scanner before falling into the locked box.

Another very relevant quote – were you paying attention in statistics class? – is simply this:
“This is just a commonsense quality control maneuver,” said Singer.   “If you had any kind of machine that did a job and you were depending on its output, you would every so often run tests on the machine to make sure that it’s doing what it says it’s doing.   It’s really, really just basic quality control.”
Duh.   Maybe we all should be thanking our lucky stars that “the wrong candidate won the election,” and thus focused proper attention on a system-design that has been so obviously wrong for so long.

“Russians” might have been a scapegoat that is still strangely-popular in Washington, DC, but the reality is that, absent genuine audit-controls, anyone(!) could have done it, and quite-possibly have gotten away with it for many years running.   Furthermore, given paper, the statistical quality controls are quite routine and inexpensive.

Every now and then, I ponder if someone out there might have been very-patiently trying to set us all up(!) for a nationwide implementation of voting systems that could be effortlessly “stuffed.”   If the very first major election had not led to a politically-unpopular result, they might have, so to speak, deployed enough of their designed-to-be unauditable systems to achieve critical mass.
chikoppi
Forum Full Member


Registered: 04/02/04
Posts: 1980
Location: N/A
 
Re:Brace for Impact
Tuesday, July 18 2017 @ 09:14 PM CDT

Wink

“Ya, that idea is dildos.” Skwisgaar Skwigelf
GET SONG FEEDBACK --> MacJams Critics Circles
particledots
Forum Full Member


Registered: 05/25/09
Posts: 1560
Location: , United States
 
Re:Brace for Impact
Wednesday, July 19 2017 @ 11:04 PM CDT

Quote by: Daugrin


Nothing unusual happened. Maybe you could relax a little? In deference to your stern, heart felt warning, please keep all informed if ya feel something hit.

Daug



https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/jul/19/six-ways-trump-is-dismantling-america-after-six-months-in-white-house
MikeRobinson
Forum Full Member


Registered: 08/29/11
Posts: 733
Location: Chattanooga, TN United States
 
Re:Brace for Impact
Thursday, July 20 2017 @ 08:51 AM CDT

One thing that people tend to forget is that the Paris Climate Accords were extremely expensive to be a part of ... already, hundreds of billions of dollars a year, and destined to be thousands of times more.

https://www.foreignpolicyjournal.com/2017/07/13/the-impact-of-the-us-withdrawing-from-the-paris-accords/

You really don’t have to be too skeptical to wonder just how much all of this “international climate talk” really had to do with ... “a few people gaining access to prodigious amounts of money.”   (And to the ability to supersede the national laws of individual nations ... a power that could be used for the stated good, or(!) for ill.  )   It’s okay to be friends with a stranger, but don’t hand over your car-keys.

The United States already has a US Environmental Protection Agency, chartered by the American people and therefore wholly accountable to them.   I think that’s enough.   It has jurisdiction in every place that the US does.

Right now, we are participants in too many treaties which create “para-national governments,” complete with enforcement powers and the right to overturn the laws that were passed in a country by vote of its people.   Whether these organizations are created with “good and noble” purposes or “vain and craven” ones is beside the point.   Yes, we do need to protect our planet’s environment, and yes, we should talk to other nations about how each of our sovereign governments is going to advance those goals in their own lands.   But, no nation need give up any portion of its sovereignty toward any such purpose ... nor pay billions of dollars to someone else who is not directly accountable for it.

The planet really isn’t going to melt down if we don’t give Paris our money and don’t give up our sovereign national prerogatives with regards to our own national territory.   Nations really can get together to talk about such issues, and to pass non-binding agreements, and then go back to their respective legislatures for them to draft and then enact appropriate law, each in their own country according to their own due process.   And Planet Earth will do just fine.

- - -

The Guardian should also bear in mind that the President does not and cannot create or pass law; neither can he interpret it.   He is an Executive ... he executes.   The only thing that he can do with regard to law is to sign – all or nothing – exactly as the massive bundle of paper is handed to him by Congress.   And even that power can be overturned.

The President is military commander-in-chief, but on the civil side he has almost no power at all.   He rules by persuasion.   (Which is actually a skill which Mr. Trump has, to the very-refined degree that made him a billionaire.   But, he does not apply it in “the Washington, DC way.”   DC insiders find him to be very strange and disruptive.   The man’s cunning.   I think he planned it that way.)

A very significant part of the problem, in my view, is that Congress is occupied by people who have no term limits.   Orrin Hatch is still alive, and still in Congress.   Looks like John McCain, like Teddy Kennedy before him, is only going to be kicked out by the Grim Reaper himself.   This does not make for a nimble legislative engine that is responsible to the people of the country.   Perhaps we need to debate and then to enact some Constitutional Amendments here.   The dynamics of the Executive Branch changed, I think for the better, when we decided that the President was entitled to no more than two consecutive terms.   I would like to see every Legislative and Judiciary(!) post be subject to term limits.   (Congressmen, Senators, and yes, Federal Judges and Supreme Court Justices, no longer serve for life.   They must “sit it out” for at least one term.)
chikoppi
Forum Full Member


Registered: 04/02/04
Posts: 1980
Location: N/A
 
Re:Brace for Impact
Thursday, July 20 2017 @ 10:12 AM CDT

Quote by: MikeRobinson
Right now, we are participants in too many treaties which create “para-national governments,” complete with enforcement powers and the right to overturn the laws that were passed in a country by vote of its people.


There are zero enforcement mechanisms in the Paris Accords and all contributions are voluntary. That's why it is seen as a superior framework to Kyoto.

What we lost was a seat at the table, the ability to negotiate measures and outcomes, and trust in the ability of the US to commit to long term international coalitions. What we lost was credibility and leadership on a major global issue.

“Ya, that idea is dildos.” Skwisgaar Skwigelf
GET SONG FEEDBACK --> MacJams Critics Circles
ktb
Forum Full Member


Registered: 02/10/06
Posts: 435
Location: Boston, MA
 
Re:Brace for Impact
Friday, July 21 2017 @ 08:28 AM CDT

Quote by: MikeRobinson
He rules by persuasion. (Which is actually a skill which Mr. Trump has, to the very-refined degree that made him a billionaire)



This is an interesting point for me. My career in business has left me with the belief that not all successful business people are good at their jobs. I have many friends who ascribe greatness to wealth. I could not disagree more. Some of the worst human beings I know are filthy rich, and they truly suck at business.

Where some in America (not necessarily you Mike :-) see a president playing 3 dimensional chess and running a masters class in strategy, I see a petulant 9 year old shitting on the salad bar.

Apologies on mixing issues, I am more interested in the discussion of why people feel so strongly that wealth equals business smarts. This I hear repeatedly. The latter issue about why we all hear and see the same events and interpret them so differently is something I have just learned to live with - reconciling there is no answer to that one.


particledots
Forum Full Member


Registered: 05/25/09
Posts: 1560
Location: , United States
 
Re:Brace for Impact
Friday, July 21 2017 @ 09:33 AM CDT

Quote by: Daugrin


Nothing unusual happened. Maybe you could relax a little? In deference to your stern, heart felt warning, please keep all informed if ya feel something hit.

Daug



http://billmoyers.com/story/trump-brought-us-america-on-the-volga/
 
Ed Hannifin
Forum Full Member


Registered: 05/24/05
Posts: 3474
Location: , MA USA
 
Re:Brace for Impact
Friday, July 21 2017 @ 07:12 PM CDT

Quote by: ktb
Quote by: MikeRobinson
He rules by persuasion. (Which is actually a skill which Mr. Trump has, to the very-refined degree that made him a billionaire)



This is an interesting point for me. My career in business has left me with the belief that not all successful business people are good at their jobs. I have many friends who ascribe greatness to wealth. I could not disagree more. Some of the worst human beings I know are filthy rich, and they truly suck at business.

Where some in America (not necessarily you Mike :-) see a president playing 3 dimensional chess and running a masters class in strategy, I see a petulant 9 year old shitting on the salad bar.

Apologies on mixing issues, I am more interested in the discussion of why people feel so strongly that wealth equals business smarts. This I hear repeatedly. The latter issue about why we all hear and see the same events and interpret them so differently is something I have just learned to live with - reconciling there is no answer to that one.





Thanks, John...

"We have to remember...when it's surrender that's called for, it's not surrender of your brains. It's surrender of your ego. It's a different thing." --Bruce Cockburn