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SmokeyVW
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Registered: 06/13/06
Posts: 7189
Location: N/A
 
Hey
Thursday, May 30 2019 @ 09:03 PM CDT

Warren Smith
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Registered: 01/24/05
Posts: 420
Location: Brooklyn, NY USA
 
Re:Hey
Saturday, June 01 2019 @ 05:42 PM CDT

Such a brutal song. What is the date on this recording?
SmokeyVW
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Registered: 06/13/06
Posts: 7189
Location: N/A
 
Re:Hey
Sunday, June 02 2019 @ 08:32 AM CDT

Quote by: Warren Smith
Such a brutal song. What is the date on this recording?

i think it was 1965, but it sounds older than that
J.A.Stewart
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Registered: 11/13/04
Posts: 4676
Location: Somewhere In Time, USA
 
Re:Hey
Sunday, June 02 2019 @ 11:51 AM CDT

The song was copyrighted in 1962 and there is an interesting sidebar story about how Roberts performed it at an entertainment event at San Quentin Penitentiary on New Year's Day 1965 that featured Louis Armstrong, Sarah Vaughn and Johnny Cash. "Likely" in the audience at that performance was Chet Powers (aka Dino Valenti, Dino Valente and Jesse Orris Farrow), another Singer-Songwriter, serving a sentence on a drug charge.

Later in 1965, a friend alerted Roberts to the fact that "Hey Joe" had been recorded and released by a SoCal rock band, The Leaves and that "Dino Valenti" had claimed authorship of the song and signed a publishing deal on that basis.

Legal negotiations returned authorship rights to Roberts, but did not prevent release of several other recordings of the song that named several other songwriters, including Dino Valenti, as the author.

While Chet Powers' stage name Dino Valenti and his songwriting name Jesse Orris Farrow may not ring a bell, he was one of the lead vocalists in Quicksilver Messenger Service and wrote the Youngbloods 1967 anthemic Peace & Love song, Get Together.

MY LATEST: A demo version of my Work-In-Progress DAILY GRIND
Warren Smith
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Registered: 01/24/05
Posts: 420
Location: Brooklyn, NY USA
 
Re:Hey
Sunday, June 02 2019 @ 04:21 PM CDT

Quote by: J.A.Stewart
... he was one of the lead vocalists in Quicksilver Messenger Service


Hmmm .. then I actually might have seen him perform at the Fillmore West in San Francisco in the summer of 1968.

Thanks for the interesting backstory on this.
Ed Hannifin
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Registered: 05/24/05
Posts: 3530
Location: , MA USA
 
Re:Hey
Tuesday, July 02 2019 @ 06:04 PM CDT

Quote by: J.A.Stewart
The song was copyrighted in 1962 and there is an interesting sidebar story about how Roberts performed it at an entertainment event at San Quentin Penitentiary on New Year's Day 1965 that featured Louis Armstrong, Sarah Vaughn and Johnny Cash. "Likely" in the audience at that performance was Chet Powers (aka Dino Valenti, Dino Valente and Jesse Orris Farrow), another Singer-Songwriter, serving a sentence on a drug charge.

Later in 1965, a friend alerted Roberts to the fact that "Hey Joe" had been recorded and released by a SoCal rock band, The Leaves and that "Dino Valenti" had claimed authorship of the song and signed a publishing deal on that basis.

Legal negotiations returned authorship rights to Roberts, but did not prevent release of several other recordings of the song that named several other songwriters, including Dino Valenti, as the author.

While Chet Powers' stage name Dino Valenti and his songwriting name Jesse Orris Farrow may not ring a bell, he was one of the lead vocalists in Quicksilver Messenger Service and wrote the Youngbloods 1967 anthemic Peace & Love song, Get Together.



There's even a bit more than that, Jay.

Billy Roberts got it from Niela Miller, who wrote the original version. Niela Miller is a psychotherapist these days, and attended my old church in Littleton, MA.

https://www.fretboardjournal.com/columns/song-week-how-baby-please-dont-go-town-became-hey-joe/





"We have to remember...when it's surrender that's called for, it's not surrender of your brains. It's surrender of your ego. It's a different thing." --Bruce Cockburn
DWL
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Registered: 10/24/06
Posts: 1444
Location: Everywhere and nowhere baby ,
 
Re:Hey
Wednesday, July 03 2019 @ 03:46 AM CDT

Fascinating stuff.

A few comments under the Youtube posting give even more detailed information about the song.

I used to play in a 60s band and it was one of my favourite covers and gave me a chance to play very bad lead guitar Wink

I really like that Niela Miller song. Her voice has a kind of pained timbre which suits the subject very well.

So, if this was the original version then Hendrix took a lot of his licks from it including that iconic bass line at the end.

Hanging in with the out crowd (All rights reserved)
J.A.Stewart
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Registered: 11/13/04
Posts: 4676
Location: Somewhere In Time, USA
 
Re:Hey
Wednesday, July 03 2019 @ 09:23 AM CDT

Quote by: Ed Hannifin
There's even a bit more than that, Jay.

Chet Powers got it from Niela Miller, who wrote the original version. Niela Miller is a psychotherapist these days, and attended my old church in Littleton, MA.

https://www.fretboardjournal.com/columns/song-week-how-baby-please-dont-go-town-became-hey-joe/







Curiouser and curioser... This simple song has had quite a journey. Wink

MY LATEST: A demo version of my Work-In-Progress DAILY GRIND
 
bronco
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Registered: 05/31/04
Posts: 596
Location: N/A
 
Re:Hey
Sunday, July 07 2019 @ 12:47 PM CDT

Wow, great find! I did hear this many, many ... well let's just say at the beginning of time. Never had a copy though so this is very nice, thanks.

One thing I notice right away is how much Hendrix copied this arrangement, all the way down to the little throwaway line, "that ain't too cool". All the little bass runs, hammer on's etc. are all there in the acoustic version. I can see why he did it as this is an advanced arrangement for the times and really adds interest to the song which won't win any awards for lyrics.

As many of you might have guessed I really love this simple recording. The man, his guitar and his voice often makes for great music that doesn't overpower you but stays with you.