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nspeers
Forum Chatty


Registered: 05/25/04
Posts: 35
Location: N/A
 
Re:Instrumental Songs
Saturday, December 25 2004 @ 10:03 PM CST

I personally find music that has a well defined "theme" - whether that's a vocal melody, instrumental melody, or a very cool use of a loop - that pushes the song forward is more interesting than one that just revolves around itself. There are songs (here and on the radio) with vocals but the song is just repeating a phrase and doesn't go anywhere. When someone takes a phrase (melody, riff, etc) and takes it further until at the end of the song the listener feeels they've discovered something - then it's worth top marks in my book. But, this is just one way of hearing songs.
qthrul
Forum Newbie


Registered: 08/28/04
Posts: 10
Location: Raleigh, NC US
 
Re:Instrumental Songs
Monday, July 25 2005 @ 11:46 PM CDT

Okay, I actually do have one on here with my voice... albeit through a vocal filter ;-)

http://www.macjams.com/song/song_profile.php?lid=7632

The rest are still very much instrumentals.

http://fudge.org/music/
stevel
Forum Full Member


Registered: 03/05/05
Posts: 619
Location: London, UK
 
Re:Instrumental Songs
Tuesday, July 26 2005 @ 01:00 AM CDT

I think that this is an interesting debate. I was listening to a Brian Eno interview recently where he was saying that people tend to respond more fully, at least initially, to music with vocals. This was not so much to do with lyrics per se as with an empathy people feel with the human voice. From my experience people tend to pay more attention to vocal tracks than instrumental ones regardless of their relative merits.. I think instrumental music is harder to hook people with , which is why most successful instrumental musicians are usually very special.
stevel
Forum Full Member


Registered: 03/05/05
Posts: 619
Location: London, UK
 
Re:Instrumental Songs
Tuesday, July 26 2005 @ 01:00 AM CDT

I think that this is an interesting debate. I was listening to a Brian Eno interview recently where he was saying that people tend to respond more fully, at least initially, to music with vocals. This was not so much to do with lyrics per se as with an empathy people feel with the human voice. From my experience people tend to pay more attention to vocal tracks than instrumental ones regardless of their relative merits.. I think instrumental music is harder to hook people with , which is why most successful instrumental musicians are usually very special.
Pie
Forum Full Member


Registered: 12/20/04
Posts: 576
Location: Cardiff, UK
 
Re:Instrumental Songs
Tuesday, July 26 2005 @ 01:13 AM CDT

I think Brian Eno summed it up pretty well. It' sjust easier for a human to relate to the emotion in a human voice than the emotion in and intrumental performance.

As for what I think (as if you care) as long as it keeps me interested everything is fine by me. Let's not get started on drum solos Smile

Cydniko
Forum Full Member


Registered: 04/26/05
Posts: 679
Location: San Francisco Bay Aea, CA USA
 
Re:Instrumental Songs
Tuesday, July 26 2005 @ 01:19 AM CDT

What to say... Most people know, that I have only posted instrumentals, however If it weren't for MJ and the need and desire to be supportive to people who have posted songs w/ lyrics, I might not ever listen to any of the words of a song. It just takes a big effort for me to listen to the words of a song that sings. Now I do have an appreciation that I might not otherwise be drawn to experience. Interestly though, I have listened to a tune w/ lyrics over and over w/o ever having listened to the words, but finally, when I do listen to the words to this same tune, I find that the words communicate the same thing as the instruments do. In response to instrumentals kind of sounding the same, I think that something tends to sound or be simular enough as something else, when it's been filled away in the same parts of our little space in our mind, the "it's easier to ignore that than to differentiate" part of the brain. It may be more difficult for people like yourself to understand what's being expressed through just instrumentation for the same reasons it's diffecult for me to take it in by the expression of words. It's just not our first and practiced way to take it in for whatever is our reason of choice. It's easier for me to paint w/ instruments, however I do have a few things in the works that have lryics. I woudln't have dreamt that I might write lyrics to a song and who knows, this might be my last attempt, but I'm gonna give it a go. Stay tuned...

Cydniko
Pie
Forum Full Member


Registered: 12/20/04
Posts: 576
Location: Cardiff, UK
 
Re:Instrumental Songs
Tuesday, July 26 2005 @ 02:06 AM CDT

I don't think Brian Eno was talking about lyrics. Just a vocal performance. Just look at how popular Opera is with some people. And a fair quantity of Opera fans don't understand the language in which the piece is performed. It's the emotional content of the vocal performance. If you're not an Opera fan check out 'Great Gig In The Sky' by Pink Floyd for an emotional vocal performance without lyrics.
Del
Forum Junior


Registered: 06/29/04
Posts: 30
Location: N/A
 
Re:Instrumental Songs
Tuesday, July 26 2005 @ 06:28 AM CDT

Quote by: cjorgensen
I hear something that sounds better-than-decent and I wonder why it wasn't fully developed. I tend to rate songs with lyrics higher than none, since the effort seems to be more.


I have to agree, being honest. Lyrics and story, emotional truth and impact through poetry are things I anticipate in music. Unless it is an excellent classical piece, a great blues guitar solo, or an instrumental jazz tune, I look for lyrics to carry the message I anticipate to find in a song. I have never much liked instrumental rock music. I don't like instrumental loop electronic music at all.

But the submitting of unperfected tracks, of tracks that sound like the person hasn't even listened closely to it to hear that it doesn't sound finished or cared for, has out of tune guitars or obvious mistakes due to rushing things to press, "not fully developed," has two effects on me. (Unless the person is posting it as a draft-in-progress wanting comments, or putting out a track seeking collaboration, both of which this site is about and can only be applauded.) One, it annoys me that they put out half-worked ideas they have given up on, just like it annoys me that they don't take the time to fill out the description or lyrics fields. I sometimes notice that people's unpolished tracks come from folks who aren't interested in fixing the problem, who say something like "I've diddled with this song long enough and just wanted to get it out so it would stopped bugging me here at home." I feel that it is too bad impatience takes precedents over the artist inside, the McMac-ing of music writing. I feel sad for the people who feel pressure to just get something out, instead of shepherding their song with care and love.

But scoring rock pop songs higher with lyrics than without has little to do with not caring for songs enough to try to perfect them. The former is merely a bias of mine I freely admit. The latter is a matter of time, personality, level of expertise, personal agendas, etc.

Having said all this, I find it a sort of a miracle that so many people actually polish their songs so artistically here at Macjams, without any outside producer pushing them or any paycheck awaiting them, and share it for free. That, it seems to be, as the more amazing thing.



 
Re:Instrumental Songs
Tuesday, July 26 2005 @ 08:30 AM CDT

Quote by: Pie
I think Brian Eno summed it up pretty well.



That's because Brian Eno is god! Notice the new album has lyrics???
 
TennesseeVic
Forum Full Member


Registered: 12/10/04
Posts: 357
Location: N/A
 
Re:Instrumental Songs
Tuesday, July 26 2005 @ 09:05 AM CDT

Quote by: Del
Quote by: cjorgensen
I hear something that sounds better-than-decent and I wonder why it wasn't fully developed. I tend to rate songs with lyrics higher than none, since the effort seems to be more.


I have to agree, being honest. Lyrics and story, emotional truth and impact through poetry are things I anticipate in music. Unless it is an excellent classical piece, a great blues guitar solo, or an instrumental jazz tune, I look for lyrics to carry the message I anticipate to find in a song.



It's music, not poetry. Why can't the message be in the notes?

I find, rather overwhelmingly, that songs with lyrics are musically boring. Having lyrics is an excuse for having a pretty lame melody, and often having a repetitive structure that would bore the beejezus out of you if it was played instrumentally. If the only variation in a song comes from the lyrics being different from verse to verse I score it down as much as a loop-based composition that refuses to show any creativity.

Sort of.